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20+ Benefits and Uses for Cinnamon Oil

Learn more about the benefits and uses of pure, high-quality cinnamon oil, including immune support, cleaning, cooking, and more, via SustainableBabySteps.com.

We tend to think of cinnamon as a stick or powder, but cinnamon oil (Cinnamomum zeylanicum) has been used as a tonic, tranquilizer, digestive aid, and more for centuries. Closely related to Cassia, it's a "hot" oil, so don't go sniffing this one from the bottle if you'd like to keep your nose hairs intact, but diffused its aroma is very spicy, warm, and (wait for it...) cinnamon-y.

IMPORTANT DISCLAIMER: None of the health topics presented on Sustainable Baby Steps have been evaluated or approved by the FDA. They should not replace personal judgment nor medical treatment when indicated, nor are they intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. Always talk to your naturopathic physician about the use of these or any other complimentary modalities. Reading this website denotes your understanding and agreement to our full disclaimer.

According to Modern Essentials, the properties within a quality brand of cinnamon bark oil include:

  • Antibacterial
  • Antidepressant
  • Antifungal
  • Anti-infectious (especially intestinal and urinary system)
  • Anti-inflammatory
  • Antimicrobial
  • Antioxidant
  • Antiparasitic
  • Antiseptic
  • Antispasmodic
  • Antiviral
  • Astringent
  • Enhancing of other oils
  • Immune Stimulant
  • Purifier
  • Sexual Stimulant
  • Warming

I think because of these properties, it's most commonly used for matters of the immune system, and to help the body fight off funk. But it can also be useful for cleaning, air quality, and mood support.

Emotionally and spiritually, cinnamon oil is related to the lower chakras and can encourage self-acceptance or self-confidence, sexual expression, and the clearing of trapped emotions from past trauma. It also correlates to our sense of safety and security, which when out of balance, can leave a person feeling jealous, insecure, controlling, or unable to be vulnerable in relationships. So it may then be beneficial for supporting healthy relationships, health boundaries, and healthy sexuality, as well.

IMPORTANT NOTE ON QUALITY

The information provided here on the properties and uses of essential oils do NOT apply to all essential oil brands. Because of lenient industry standards and a lack of regulation on terms such as "natural" or "pure", much of what you find at the drug store is not a therapeutic grade of essential oil and may lack real quality or even contain contaminants.

A LOT goes into creating a high quality essential oil. The best essential oil brands follow these guidelines:

  • Proper plant varieties
  • Grown in their indigenous region around the world
  • Grown without chemical pesticides, herbicides, etc
  • Harvested with precise timing to ensure peak properties
  • Extracted with proper temp and pressure to preserve oil molecules
  • Third-party testing of each and every batch
  • Stand behind the internal use of their oils

Learn what to look for in safe, effective essential oils here.

How to Use Cinnamon Essential Oil

Traditionally, cinnamon oil uses these application guidelines. Click the banner to understand what each symbol means and to learn how each is used safely and effectively:

How to use essential oils!
Adults Children/Sensitive Pregnancy

Precaution: Always dilute. This oil is not generally suitable for children under 6 and should be diluted more for children over 6. Repeated or undiluted use can cause skin sensitization. Diffuse with caution as well, since this potent oil may irritate nasal passages (don't inale directly from bottle or diffuser). Always test for skin sensitivity prior to widespread use and use on the feet when possible. Excessive use of any oil can lead to skin sensitization. Keep out of eyes, ears, or nose. Not all oils are created equal, so test brands carefully, and never use an oil in a way not recommended by its maker.

Click this link for more application guidance and precautions.

IMPORTANT DISCLAIMER: None of the health topics presented on Sustainable Baby Steps have been evaluated or approved by the FDA. They should not replace personal judgment nor medical treatment when indicated, nor are they intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. Always talk to your naturopathic physician about the use of these or any other complimentary modalities. Reading this website denotes your understanding and agreement to our full disclaimer.

Suggested and Possible Uses of Cinnamon Oil

The following are potential uses found in or on Modern Essentials, Aromatic Science, PubMed.gov, as well as through anecdotal experience and other resources. Use them to inspire your own ideas, experiment, and see what works for you.

Airborne Bacteria
Diffuse cinnamon oil during cold and flu season, or add to a cotton ball and stick in your car's vent while you drive. Also check out an air purifying blend.

Bacterial Infections
Use cinnamon aromatically (such as diffusing) or topically (diluted). Try massaging over the area of infection within a carrier oil.

Bites/Stings
Prevent infections and irritation by diluting 1 drop of cinnamon bark oil with 3 drops of carrier oil and applying over the area.

Breathing
For respiratory concerns start by diffusing in the air. You can also try massaging over the chest and neck (diluted first). A blend for respiratory support can also be helpful.

Cooking
Cinnamon oil is "Generally Recognized as Safe" (GRAS) by the FDA, and a quality brand may be used in cooking. Start off with a single drop (or less, using a toothpick to grab a small amount) until you know your ratios.

Diabetes
Cinnamon oil has been shown to help regulate blood sugar. Add to your food, take 1-2 drops within an empty capsule, or use for self massage over the area of the pancreas.

Diverticulitis
Help decrease the inflammation and promote healing by massaging diluted cinnamon oil over the abdomen daily.

Fungal Infections
Diffuse in the air, and dilute to apply topically to the area of concern or to the soles of the feet for fast absorption.

General Tonic
Diffusing this in the air on a regular basis is uplifting and supports the immune system. You can also use it topically, or in a bath (I'd dilute with a carrier oil and THEN add to a bath!).

Immune System Stimulate
Diffuse throughout cold and flu season, within the classroom (makes a great gift for teachers), or dilute and apply topically. Also consider an antiviral blend.

Infection
Depending on the type of infection you can massage the diluted cinnamon bark oil into the soles of the feet, over the area of concern, or simply diffuse throughout the area.

Libido Stimulate
Cinnamon oil is said to be an aphrodisiac for many. (I can't vouch for that one yet.) Try aromatic or topical usage on a regular basis (lower abdomen may be okay but AVOID genitals - ouch!).

Mold
Fight fungus, mildew, and mold by applying cinnamon to the area. Use it in your cleaning products, diffuse it regularly in areas prone to mold, or apply it directly.

Pancreas Support
As stated above (Diabetes), cinnamon has been found to support blood sugar levels and healthy pancreas function. Massage the diluted oil over the pancreas, to the soles of the feet, or use in cooking or as a supplement.

Physical Fatigue
Cinnamon bark oil is very warming and may increase circulation, blood flow to the brain, and energy levels when used aromatically. Try diffusing, or adding to a localized massage.

Pneumonia
During illness, diffuse cinnamon bark oil into the room to aid the healing process.

Typhoid
This bacterial infection may be cleared with cinnamon. Apply a diluted mixture to the soles of the feet daily, or use for a full body massage. Diffuse it regularly.

Vaginal Infection/Vaginitis
Diluted cinnamon oil may assist in fighting infections. Be sure to check for sensitivity and use caution. Start by diluting and massaging over the lower abdomen, or reflex points of the feet.

Viral Infections
Very antiviral, massage the diluted cinnamon oil into the soles of the feet, over the area of concern, or over the whole body.

Warming
The opposite of peppermint, cinnamon bark oil is very warming. Massage over your heart center, into the soles of the feet, or around the neck for the best results.

Other possible cinnamon oil uses include: circulation booster, fighting colds or coughs, aiding in digestion, increasing energy, eases inflammation associated with rheumatism, and even removing warts.

In addition to cinnamon oil, also consider trying Cassia, Cypress, Frankincense, an antiviral blend, Wild Orange (or other citrus oils), or check out other essential oils here.



Interested in Essential Oils? Click here for free workshops, guides, and more, via OrganicHomeHealth.com





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